Scarborough Bluffs

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Scarborough Bluffs
Bluffs at Guildwood. May, 2002.



Scarborough Bluffs
Lake Ontario shore east of Guildwood. May, 2002.



Scarborough Bluffs
Erosion of the bluffs. May, 2002.



Scarborough Bluffs
View of bluffs from near end of Bellamy Ravine. May, 2002.



Scarborough Bluffs
View to the west from Guildwood. May, 2002.



Scarborough Bluffs
Bluffs at Guildwood. May, 2002.



Scarborough Bluffs
Bluffs at Guildwood behind Sylvan Avenue. May, 2002.



Scarborough Bluffs
Bellamy Ravine. May, 2002.



Introduction

The Scarborough Bluffs stretch for about 14km along the Lake Ontario shore, from the Eastern Beaches of Toronto in the west, to West Hill in the east. At their highest at Cliffside, the bluffs rise 65m (211ft) above the water. At the Bellamy Ravine, they rise about 60m, and at Guildwood, the height drops to 50m.

The bluffs have been formed primarily by erosion of the packed clay soil. In some places, such as the western end of Bluffers Park, the erosion has shaped the clay into interesting shapes.

Visiting the Bluffs

The best place to view the Bluffs is from the shore. The only road access is from Brimley Road at Cliffside, which leads down to Bluffers Park, home of several yacht clubs.

Scarborough Bluffs Park on Cecil Drive, south of Midland Avenue and Kingston Road, is a good spot to view the Cathedral Bluffs from behind. This spot also offers a good view of Bluffers Park.

The road down to the shore at Guildwood is reserved for construction vehicles. But there is parking lot at Guildwood Parkway and Galloway Road from which you can walk down to the shore. If you find the parking lot closed, try the parking lot at the Guild Inn, just to the west. A nice path leads from that parking lot down to the shore.

Another way down is through the Bellamy Ravine, but there you have to park on the street. This is a more difficult route since the ravine drops 100m over its 1000m length.