Todmorden Mills Park

Todmorden Mills
Todmorden Mills.

Historic plaque at Todmorden Mills:

TODMORDEN MILLS

In 1794-5 Isaiah and Aaron Skinner built a sawmill and grist-mill near this site. A third share in the mill property was held, 1799-1805, by their brother-in-law, Pashall Terry, a member of the first Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada, who had moved to this area by 1798. Terry lived nearby until his death in 1808. Later the mills were jointly owned by Colin Skinner and John Eastwood. By 1823 Thomas Helliwell had built a brewery and a distillery in the immediate vicinity and within four years Eastwood and Skinner had constructed the second paper mill in Upper Canada. A village called "Todmorden" after the English home of the Helliwels grew up to the north-east of the mills.

Erected by the Archeological and Historic Sites Board, Ministry of Colleges and University.

Todmorden Mills
Last surviving station of the former Belt Line.

The Don Station, the last surviving station of the Belt Line built in 1899, was moved from its original location on the Don River just south of Queen Street starting on August 2, 1969. Two days later, the three pieces of the station were reassembled at its new location in Todmorden Mills.

Todmorden Mills
Historical Museum.

Neighborhood

Don Valley Pape & O'Connor
Brick Works Park Todmorden Mills Pape Village
Prince Edward Viaduct Broadview Danforth & Chester