Busking in Support of Joe's MILL

Category: Ukulele
Mon, 13 Sep 2010, 14:38

Ever willing to push the limits of my comfort zone musically, I eagerly plunged into volunteering for a couple of busking sessions a few weeks ago. The idea was for area musicians to busk for a half hour on Kingston's market square and donate the proceeds to the Joe Chithalen Memorial Musical Instrument Lending Library.

uke player

Now then, I'm the first to admit that I'm not the greatest musical performer. But I also admit to an ulterior motive, to try to raise awareness of the ukulele in this city. So I picked out about 20 of my best songs, and went downtown.

My first session was at 11AM at the corner of Brock and King, at the north end of the market. On market day, this is the busiest, and noisiest, corner. Most people just walked by, few willing to admit to the presence of a street performer. I was relieved about 40 minutes later by a guy playing blues on a resonator guitar.

I then signed up for another session, but at a quieter corner of the market. Fewer people walked by, but there were a few sitting close by listening to the performances, sometimes commenting on the songs. This time, Roger, the librarian at Joe's M.I.L.L. joined me on acoustic bass for a few songs, which was much appreciated.

What did I learn from this? First, I'll never make a living by busking on the ukulele! But more importantly, I now know first hand what it feels like on the other side. I've always enjoyed listening to street musicians, and generally, I always try to be supportive, even if I don't have time to stay and listen. But most people just pass by quickly, not even wanting to risk the shortest eye contact. While I was performing, frankly, I didn't care that much about the loose change thrown into my ukulele case. I just wanted at least some small acknowledgment from the passersby.

So my point is this: Be kind to street musicians. They've all practised for years to get to the point of being able to perform in public. Even if you can't spare some change, at least say hi, or offer some sign of support. It doesn't take much effort on your part, but can mean a lot to the performer.

Omnifariously yours, Hans

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ukulele image