Kingston Mills

Photo of Rideau Canal Lock 49 at Kingston Mills
Rideau Canal lock 49 at Kingston Mills.

The Rideau Canal was built from 1826 to 1832 for military purposes to allow boats to travel to Lake Ontario bypassing the St. Lawrence River, which was too close for comfort to the United States. The supervisor of construction was Lieutenant Colonel John By of the British Royal Engineers. The canal was pushed through the rocky wilderness by the labor of thousands of Irish immigrants and French Canadians.

Photo of Rideau Canal Locks at Kingston Mills
Pond at Kingston Mills between locks 46 and 47.

The canal contains 47 locks on the Rideau and Cataraqui Rivers. From the Ottawa River to Newboro, 31 locks raise boats 83 meters. Another 14 locks lower them 50 meters to Lake Ontario at Kingston Mills. Boats can also take a side trick via the two Beveridge Locks to Perth.

Photo of Rideau Canal Locks at Kingston Mills
Pond at Kingston Mills looking toward lock 47.

The four locks at Kingston Mills carry pleasure boats from Colonel By Lake along granite cliffs down to the Cataraqui River, leading to Kingston’s Inner Harbor. To reach the locks, drive north on Montreal Street, and turn right on Kingston Mills Road. Further upstream are the locks at Brewers Mills.

Photo of the blockhouse at Kingston Mills
Kingston Mills blockhouse